Psalm 53: It Bears Repeating

Psalm 53 is basically Psalm 14 with some small differences. They were part of two separate collections of psalms. For some reason when the two were combined, they left these psalms as separate entities rather than combine them into one.

I have found this interesting to reflect on as I look at the multiple files I have in my computer of the same manuscript. I have the copy before I sent it to the copy-editor, the copy sent back from the editor with suggestions, and my revised copy—revised multiple times before I dare go to publish. In the process, the Kindle version may end up slightly different from the print copy as once I receive a printed proof copy, I always find errors I missed meaning yet more revisions. I just finished revising and resubmitting a book in Kindle and print where there is a word different. I changed the word in one, then decided on trying a different word while updating the ebook and forgot to go back and change the print version. . . Anyway . . .

Without the assistance of technology, with hand-written manuscripts being copied over, it’s a wonder to me that these two are as close as they are.

I also find myself reflecting on the necessity of repetition for the learning process. Learning theorist know that children learn through repetition. We get to be adults and somehow, magically, we are supposed to get it the first time around. Doesn’t work that way. We still need repetitions to learn. In fact, with all of the glut of knowledge out there filling up space in our brain, I suspect we adults need to hear something even more times than children before it finally sinks in. Some ideas bear repeating.

With that in mind, and in celebration of my birthday tomorrow, I’m giving myself a break and repeating what I wrote for Psalm 14. This psalm is a gem, short but full of imagery: God looking down from heaven shaking his head at those “who eat up my people as they eat bread.” (4b)

To read post, click here. Enjoy!

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